Coordinating Conjunctions and Correlative Conjunctions
Tuesday, 13 October 2015 on

A conjunction joins words or groups of words in a sentence.
  • I ate lunch with Kate and Derma.
  • Because it is rainy today, the trip is canceled.
  • She didn’t press the bell, but I did.
There are three types of conjunctions:

1.Coordinating Conjunctions
     a.Connect words, phrases, or clauses that are independent or equal
     b.and, but, or, so, for, yet, and not

2.Correlative Conjunctions
     a.Used in pairs
     b.both/and, either/or, neither/nor, not only/but also

3.Subordinating Conjunctions
     a.Used at the beginning of subordinate clauses
     b.although, after, before, because, how, if, once, since, so that, until, unless, when, while, where, whether, etc.

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Mood for Grammar
Thursday, 1 October 2015 on

A mood shows the writer’s attitude toward what he/she is saying.

Indicative Mood states an actuality or fact.
  • We will go to see a movie this Sunday.
  • I’ll follow you.
Imperative Mood makes a request.
  • Let’s go to see a movie this weekend!
  • Please stop bugging me!
Subjunctive Mood expresses a doubtful condition (contrary to fact) and is often used with an "if" clause.
  • If I were you, I wouldn’t buy a house.
  • I wish I were more organized.
The following verbs often attract the subjunctive mood: ask, recommend, suggest, wish, insist, order, commend, request, and demand.A verb in the subjunctive mood may have a different form. The subjunctive for the present tense third-person singular drops the s or es so that it looks and sounds like the present tense for everything else. In the subjunctive mood, the verb to be is be in the present tense and were in the past tense, regardless of what the subject is.

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